Sarah Ssewanyana holds a PhD in Agricultural Economics from University of Sydney, Australia; Masters in Science in Agricultural Economics from University of Manitoba, Canada; and a Bachelor of Statistics (Hons) from Makerere University. Sarah joined the Economic Policy Research Centre (EPRC) in March 2003 as a Senior Research Fellow and later appointed as a Principal Research Fellow in 2008. In 2009, she was appointed the Executive Director of EPRC. She has steered the Centre to be recognized as one of the globally renowned policy think tanks.


Sarah is a well-grounded researcher with extensive experience in policy-oriented economic research. She has extensively researched on poverty, food security, health, education and social service delivery, among others. She has a number of peer-reviewed publications and working papers in the above research areas.


Prior to joining EPRC in March 2003, Sarah was at the Institute of Statistics and Applied Economics, Makerere University where she had lectured to graduate and undergraduate students for more than 10 years. She was an external examiner to masters and PhD dissertations for the Uganda Management Institute, Makerere University and University of Sydney, Australia.


Sarah has served on various boards/committees. Currently, she serves as a member of the: Uganda National Panel Steering Committee; Presidential Economic Council, Expanded Board of the National Planning Authority; and Uwezo National Advisory Committee, among others.

Sarah Ssewanyana: publications

A pathway to social protection development in Uganda: A synthesis report

The funds allocated to social protection in Uganda are still small and insufficient. More still, the actions taken by the institutions responsible for spearheading social protection are not adequate. This synthesis reviews the institutions, policies, laws, implementation plans and evidence that are aligned to support social protection in Uganda.

Rural Women Entrepreneurship In Uganda: A Synthesis Report On Policies, Evidence, And Stakeholders

This synthesis report puts into perspective the nature of Uganda’s rural woman entrepreneurs, paying close attention to the women targeted by the Uganda Women Entrepreneurship Programme (UWEP). In particular, it looks at the status of women employment and entrepreneurship in Uganda, laws and policies, and assesses the viability of women entrepreneurship.

Governments’ financing of social protection initiatives dismal

The need for multi-faced interventions from both state and non-state actors is essential in addressing various vulnerabilities within different social groups.

Rural women entrepreneurs in Uganda continue to face multiple challenges that impede their enterprise growth and expansion, despite pragmatic interventions from government and non-state actors to enhance entrepreneurship.

The paper provides insights on the tax-benefit implications of the FY2014/15 tax proposals as well as the 2012/13 income tax reform. 

Sarah Ssewanyana

Sarah SsewanyanaExecutive Director

Contacts: 041-541023/4, 540141
Email: ssewanyana@eprcug.org

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